HOME COOKING HEALTH  MOBILES VISA  JOBS EDUCATION FASHION  TRAVEL PAKISTAN
 
BEAUTIFUL PAKISTAN
 

Murree

  Nathia Gali
  Ghora Gali
  Bhurban
 

Patriata

  Daman-e-Koh
  Pir Sohawa
 

Ayubia

 

Swat

  Malam Jabba
  Kalam
 

Gilgit

 

Skardu

  Chitral
  Kalash
  Fort Munro
  Kaghan
  Ziarat
  Naran
  Hunza
  Abbottabad
  Khyber Pass
   
   
   
   

 


 
 

KALASH Valley, kalashi People

KAFIR-KALASH TRIBE
Kalash Girl
One of the major attractions of Chitral are the Kalash valleys- the home of the Kafir-Kalash or "Wearers of the Black Robes", a primitive pagan tribe. Their ancestry is enveloped in mystery and is the subject of controversy. A legend says that five soldiers of the legions of Alexander of Macedonia settled in Chitral and are the progenitors of the Kafir-Kalash.

Over 3,000-strong Kafir-Kalash live in the valley of Birir, Bumburet and Rambur, south of Chitral. Bumburet, the largest and the most picturesque valley of the Kafir-Kalash , is 40 kms. from Chitral and is connected by a jeep-able road. Birir, 34 kms. away is accessible by a jeep-able road. Rambur is 32 kms from Chitral.

KelashThe Kalash women wear black gowns of coarse cloth in summer and hand-spun wool dyed in black in winter. Their picturesque headgear is made of woolen black material decked out with cowry shells, buttons and crowned with a large coloured feather.

The Kalash are fun loving people who love music and dancing particularly on occasion of their religious festival like Joshi Chilinjusht (14th & 15th May-spring), Phool (20th – 25th September) and Chomas (18th to 21st December for a week).

Polo in Chitral is as popular as in Gilgit. Polo matches are great attractions at festive occasions. A regular Polo tournament is held every year (First week of July) at Shandur Pass.

 


 During early nineteenth century, Hunza resented Kashmir's attempts to gain control and its rulers periodically expelled Kashmir garrisons, threatended Gilgit, and politicked with the rulers of Kashgar to the north where the Russians were gaining influence. Fearing Russians infiltration into their northern frontiers, the British took over direct political control at Gilgit in 1889. Incesant fratricidal intrigues in Hunza and Nagar made the areas doubly insecure. This, coupled with the Mir of Hunza's consistent intransigence induced the British to march on Hunza in December 1891, where they fought a decisive battle at Nilit, 60 km beyond Diaynor Bridge. After this the British garrisoned Aliabad until 1897 when Hunza became a princely state protected by the Government of British India. After the Pakistan was created in 1947, the people of Hunza also gained liberation and the princely state was merged in Pakistan.

 

 
 

 


 

 
 
 
 

COPYRIGHT© 2001-16  PakVisit.com