Personalities>Tipu Sultan




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Tippu (TIPU) Sultan, called "THE TIGER OF MYSORE" was an energetic and colourful sultan of Mysore who was famous in the wars of the late 18th century in southern India; he was exceptional for having never allied himself with the English against any other Indian ruler.

The son of Hyder  Ali of Mysore, Tippu was trained in military tactics by French officers employed by his father.

" During the Second Mysore War (1780-84) he defeated Col. John Brathwaite on the banks of the Coleroon River (February 1782). He succeeded his father in 1782, and with the 1784 Treaty of Mangalore he concluded peace with the British and assumed the title of sultan. In 1787 his emissaries to France failed to secure a military alliance against England. In 1789 he provoked British invasion by attacking their ally the Raja (king) of Travancorc. His brilliant generalship in three campaigns, two of which the governor general Lord Charles Cornwallis himself commanded, held the British at bay for more than two years, but he had to cede half his dominions in the Treaty of Seringapatam (March 1792); he also had to pay 30,000,000 rupees and give up two sons as hostages.

Discontented with British power, Tippu Sultan sent emissaries to Arabia; Kabul, Afghanistan; Constantinople; France; and the French island of Mauritius; as well as to certain Indian rulers, but he received no encouragement other than a few recruits from Mauritius. The negotiations with revolutionary France became known to the British, and on that pretext the governor general, Lord Mornington (later the marquess of Wellesley), in March 1799 launched the Fourth Mysore War, having made a tripartite treaty with the Nizam (ruler of Hyderabad) and the Maralhas. Concerned that Napoleon's forces in Egypt might come to Tippu's aid. Mornington expedited his attack on Seringapatnam, storming the capital on May 4, 1799 with forces from Bombay, Hyderabad, and Madras.

Wounded three times, he died from a shot through the temple. His remains were interred near those of his father in the mausoleum of Lall Baug, accompanied by horrendous thunderstorms that local Muslims considered symbolic. An able general and administrator with literary tastes. Tippu Sultan retained the loyalty of his Hindu as well as Muslim subjects. Humane treatment for prisoners A clause in the proposed treaty of alliance with the French stated, " I demanded that male and female prisoners as well English and Portuguese, who shall be taken by the republican troops or by mine, shall be treated with humanity, " In short Tipu was an enlightened ruler, the sheet-anchor of whose state-policy was the well-being of all his subjects irrespective of caste, creed or class. He took his stand on the bedrock of humanity, regarding all his subjects as equal citizen to live in peace, harmony and concord


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